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The 5 Best Gas Snow Blowers of 2022

When it snows, you need to be ready! Whether you have a long driveway or a small sidewalk to clear, you need the best gas snow blower for the job.

Every editorial product is independently selected, though we may be compensated or receive an affiliate commission if you buy something through our links. Ratings and prices are accurate and items are in stock as of time of publication.

The Best Gas Snow Blowers Of 2022 Ft Via MerchantVIA MERCHANT

Finding the best gas snow blower can be a tricky task. With plenty of options to consider—like single stage to two-stage, electric starts, width and price, to name a few—it all comes down to what snow removal features work best for you. It’s important for you to be able to easily maneuver your gas snow blower around, and it should be able to handle the size of your property so you can get the job done with no mistakes.

If you’re new to the snow blower market or haven’t bought one in years, there are plenty of new options to consider. When it comes time to clear snow, here are the best gas powered snow blower options to buy.

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Two Stage Gas Blower Ecomm Via Lowes.comvia merchant

Best Overall

Ariens Deluxe Self-Propelled Snow Blower

Whether Mother Nature leaves just a few inches or a few feet of snow for you to clear, the Ariens Deluxe gas snow blower is our best overall pick. This two-stage beast clears heavy, wet snow in large areas with ease, and starts up quickly with just the push of a button. You’ll plow through those heavy winters with the snow blower’s self-propelled drive, with six forward and two reverse speeds.

Despite it weighing 275 pounds, the auto-turn feature helps you round corners with little effort. The crank chute has 200-degree rotation that can be adjusted on the fly, so you don’t have to stop to adjust every time you make a turn. A bonus perk: It has heated handles to keep you warm even on the coldest days!

Pros

  • Easy to maneuver
  • Heated handles
  • Ideal for clearing large areas

Cons

  • Size may make it difficult to store

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2 / 5

Toro Power Clear Single Stage Gas Snow Thrower Ecomm Acehardware.comvia merchant

Best Single-Stage

Toro Power Clear Gas Snow Thrower

This Toro gas snow blower blasts through deep snow with a powerful engine, and launches the white stuff up to 40 feet. The single-stage machine easily directs the snow where you want it, just squeeze the quick-shoot trigger and slide the grip. The blower’s compact design means you’ll have more room for storage, plus it makes maneuvering winter messes a breeze. Buyers also appreciate the easy-to-use electric start. And FYI: Here’s what to do if your snowblower won’t start.

Pros

  • Power to blast through deep snow
  • Self-propel system gets the job done faster
  • Easy electric start
  • Easily change the chute direction with the quick-shoot trigger

Cons

  • Pricey

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3 / 5

Single Stage Gas Blower Ecomm Via Lowes.comvia merchant

Best Budget

Craftsman Single-Stage Snow Blower

If you live in an area prone to light snowfalls and want to upgrade from shoveling your driveway, consider the Craftsman gas snow blower. This budget-friendly model clears a 21 inch path, and is ideal for 6 inches of snow or less. A simple push-button electric start eliminates pull-starting a cold engine.

Plus, with its 4-cycle engine, you don’t need to mix oil and gas, making maintenance a much easier task. This single-stage gas snowblower is compact at just 35 inches high and 95 pounds, so not only is it easy to push and make turns, but it won’t take up much space in your garage or shed.

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Lightweight
  • Easy to start
  • Compact size for easy storage

Cons

  • Works best for 6 inches of snow or less
  • No power steering

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4 / 5

Ariens Deluxe Gas Snow Blower Ecomm Via Lowes.comvia merchant

Best Two-Stage

Ariens Deluxe Two-Stage Snow Blower

For heavier, wetter snow, a two-stage snow blower is ideal for clearing large areas. The Ariens Deluxe Two-Stage has two augers—one to cut into the snow and break it down; one to move it through the chute—and clears a wide 28-inch path. A 14 inch steel auger helps you move quickly through heavy snow and ice, even the hard-packed stuff left from snow plows at the end of your driveway.

This 250-pound snow blower has auto turning for precise and effortless steering around corners, eight variable speeds and crank chute control, so you don’t have to stop to adjust the chute whenever you change directions.

Pros

  • Perfect for heavy, wet snow
  • Easy to maneuver
  • In-dash headlight

Cons

  • Size may make it difficult to store

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5 / 5

Powersmart Snow Blower Engine Ecomm Via Amazon.comvia merchant

Best Value

PowerSmart Self-Propelled Snow Blower

For those looking for the best bang for their buck, check out the PowerSmart Self-Propelled Two-Stage Snow Blower, which is one of the top-rated snow blowers on Amazon. This model easily clears up to a foot of snow, and its anti-clogging system prevents augers from clogging when the snow is wet or icy.

This self-propelled gas snow blower has eight speeds, an electric push-button start and you can operate the chute with just one hand. At 143 pounds, it’s also lighter in weight than other two-stage gas snow blowers, making it far easier to maneuver. Buyers also noted it was easy to assemble.

Pros

  • Budget-friendly
  • Anti-clog system
  • Electric push-button start

Cons

  • Works best for 12 inches of snow or less

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What to Consider When Buying a Gas Snow Blower

When buying a gas snow blower, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, how much snow do you generally get where you live? What size area will you need to clear? Some models, like one-stage snowblowers, work best for smaller areas and lighter amounts of snow. Two-stage snowblowers have two augers, and make quick work of large driveways and heavy, wet snow.

If you live in an area where you’ll spend a lot of time clearing snow in the winter, you might want additional features such as a headlight for night use and handle warmers to keep you comfortable. You should also consider the size and weight of gas powered snowblowers. Lighter models are easier to maneuver, especially on turns, but might not be able to handle heavy snowfalls. Large models easily handle mountains of snow, but might be too big to comfortably fit in your garage.

FAQs

How much gas does a snow blower use?

This depends on how large the gas tank is, the weight and the height of the snow, and how big your gas snow blower’s engine is. On average, you’ll get about one hour to 90 minutes worth of running time with a full tank of gas.

Should I store my snow blower with gas in it?

Always check with the manufacturer or the buyer’s guide, which will have recommendations for maintenance and storage, along with snow blower oil change tips. If you’re using gas straight from the gas pump, then yes, you’ll want to drain the fuel before storing a snow blower for the summer.

Some companies recommend adding a stabilizer as an additive for the off-season. Stabilizers help prevent clogs, which allow you to keep the fuel in the snow blower. However, some brands recommend draining gas before storing it for the season, even if the gasoline has been stabilized with an additive.

How We Found the Best Gas Snow Blower

As shopping experts, our only job is to help you find a winning product. We start with the research and reporting basics—what products are made of, what they look like and how much they cost—to ensure that we’re only recommending the buys that are worth your time and money. Then, we research the features that speak to the product’s quality, taking advice from industry insiders and subject matter experts on what makes a product a smart value (or worthy of a splurge). Finally, we do the work of combing through user reviews to see how real people interact with the product, and if it stands up to the test.

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Rachel Brougham
Writer and editor with a background in news writing, editorial and column writing and content marketing.